Archive for 2017

New research looks at the influence of race and emotional context on face perception

Reports by some media outlets and community outreach organizations that track and document police violence demonstrate that more than any other demographic group, young black males may be at a particularly heightened risk of fatal police encounters. The underlying causes for the reported violent interactions between police and black individuals are likely dependent on a number of factors. To shed light on the issue, one approach taken by psychologists and neuroscientists has been to investigate … Read More

Celebrating our ROSE Award winners

We’ve all experienced those magical moments when someone makes your day – by treating you like family, by looking out for your well-being, by making that extra effort that transforms a small act into a big difference. OHSU’s ROSE Award honors these experiences and celebrates the exceptional acts of service excellence that make our workplace a community. We recognize these individuals for providing acts of compassion, dedication, tenacity, generosity, communication, and leadership, among others. The … Read More

A strong neuroscience program is about to get stronger—meet leaders and researchers at the forefront

Today, neuroscience at OHSU is poised for dramatic growth, driven by emerging areas of research strength in the fields of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration and a planned investment of at least $100 million. Led by long-time campus leaders and new luminaries, the university is doubling down on its quest: contribute in a major way to understanding the mystery between our ears and, above all, improve brain health. Leadership On the faculty since 1982, Dennis Bourdette, M.D., F.A.A.N., chairs neurology in the … Read More

Meet Patricia O’Shea, Brain Resource Center volunteer

It’s Volunteer Week here at OHSU. This interview was originally published in 2015, but Patricia O’ Shea is still here and going strong! She has been volunteering since 2010 and as of April 2017 has put in over 820 hours of volunteer time. Thank you so much for your continued dedication! Patricia O’Shea volunteers at our Brain Resource Center and is an active member of our Brain Research Awareness and Information Network (BRAINet). Why did you … Read More

April Spotlight: Neuroradiology and the fMRI exam

April is host to Neurodiagnostic Week, a time to honor and celebrate the contributions of our neurodiagnostic professionals. Our Neuroradiology department is an integral part of the diagnostic evaluation process and collaborates with all OHSU clinical and medical teams including but not limited to neurosurgery, interventional neuroradiology, ENT surgery, orthopedic surgery, and vascular surgery. One of the most advanced techniques we use is a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) exam. This exam is tailored to the location of the … Read More

Parkinson’s patient worried about DBS surgery — but not about the team at OHSU

Marilee Thompson worried about having surgery to treat her Parkinson’s disease. She knew the risks of deep brain stimulation surgery were low, she said, but “somebody makes up the statistics” on the few who have complications. What she didn’t worry about was the surgical team at OHSU. Thompson knew that Dr. Kim Burchiel, an OHSU neurosurgeon, had been doing deep brain stimulation for a long time. He was the first doctor in the U.S. to … Read More

Neuroscience research news you may have missed

Because so many people have neurological disorders, research to prevent, treat or cure them is essential. Here at the OHSU Brain Institute, we bring doctors, laboratory scientists, and neurological experts together to develop advanced treatments and prevention strategies. We’ve compiled a list of just a few of the more recent research innovations coming from our labs: Javits Award – Dr. Mary Heinricher receives $2.3 million Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award for her research into chronic pain: Portland … Read More

Deep brain stimulation surgery: Eugene patient shares his story

Parkinson’s disease nearly overwhelmed Colin Halstead’s life. He needed two canes to walk. He took 27 pills a day. His voice was hard to understand, and his ability to make facial expressions had all but slipped away. His employer thought he needed to go on disability. Then he faced needing his parents to move from Sutherlin to Eugene to take care of him. At 48, he felt like a child again. “Just thinking about being sick for … Read More

The role of the athletic trainer in the concussion clinic

For many years athletic trainers have been on the sidelines helping concussed athletes, starting with the initial injury through the return-to-play process, and back onto the field. We use our education and skills to assess and treat injured athletes, to make sure they don’t re-enter the game with concussion symptoms, to help them get the support they need in the school setting, and to collaborate with team physicians to make sure these athletes can safely … Read More

Researcher and neurologist grateful for early-career grant

The Oregon Charitable Tax Checkoff grant was the first research grant I ever received. I was a neurology resident at the time, and with guidance from Dr. Jeff Kaye, the OHSU Layton Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center director, I applied for funds to complete a clinical study of a commonly used “outcome measure” in clinical trials with Alzheimer’s disease. That was also my first clinical research study.  We were able to publish the results in an … Read More