Posts Tagged ‘heart disease’

Your health questions answered: Heart care for a father with diabetes

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This National Men’s Health Week, one of our cardiovascular experts is on the hot seat. We know that facing a heart condition can be difficult for patient and families, and that getting the right information can provide peace of mind. With Father’s Day on the horizon, a recent question to our providers about care for a father with diabetes is especially timely. Q: My father has diabetes but is in good … Read More

Pregnancy and the heart

Heart disease is not always a disease of the elderly. According to the American Heart Association, there are over 15,000 deaths due to heart disease annually in the U.S. in young women under the age of 55. While most young patients have at least one risk factor for a cardiac event, many women underestimate their cardiovascular risk. These risk factors may come from family history, lifestyle, and unique to female patients: conditions that developed during pregnancy. … Read More

Ask the expert: Should I take aspirin to prevent a heart attack?

This week you may have seen news headlines touting aspirin as a way to prevent heart attacks. But does that apply to you? OHSU experts are cautioning against a run to the pharmacy until you know whether you meet the specific criteria required to benefit from the regimen. Many people with existing heart disease are advised to take a low-dose aspirin every day to prevent blood clots, the cause of heart attacks and most strokes. … Read More

Heart attack symptoms, response differ in women vs. men

A woman’s heart attack can have different underlying causes, symptoms and outcomes compared to men, according to a new scientific statement released last week by the American Heart Association. The new statement from the American Heart Association is its first to address heart attacks in women, and the organization is concerned women are being undertreated. It notes that there have been dramatic declines in cardiovascular deaths among women due to improved treatment and prevention of … Read More

Your health questions answered: What can I do about high cholesterol?

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This month, one of our cardiovascular experts is on the hot seat. Q. I eat healthy, exercise and am not overweight – but I have high cholesterol. What can I do? A. Average low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol is below 125; when it is above 160, you may have been born with high cholesterol. Talk to your primary care provider. You may have a genetic condition called familial … Read More

The magic bullet for heart health?

If you knew there was a “magic bullet” that would reduce your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by 92% and lower your risk of other cardiovascular risk factors, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol, by 66%, would you take it? A recent large, prospective study showed what appears to be the key to drastically reducing the risk for heart disease in women aged 27-44, potentially preventing more than 70% of CHD and … Read More

Love yourself. Love your heart.

By Kate Geller, Knight Cardiovascular Institute This Valentine’s Day, try to take inspiration from all of the heart-shaped cards, chocolate boxes and balloons to show yourself some love, by focusing on your own heart health. Almost everyone has risk factors for heart disease, but thankfully, we can all practice prevention by exercising heart-healthy eating habits. Margarine vs. Butter? A question our experts often get from patients is around cooking with margarine or butter. According to Tina Kaufman, … Read More

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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