Recent Comments

  1. Hi David. Good question. Tracy Severson, a registered dietitian at the OHSU Knight Cardiovascular Institute, had this to say about cooking with olive oil:

    Oils should not be heated to the point of smoking, which is when oxidation occurs. Because extra-virgin olive oil has a lower smoke point than many other oils, it should not be used for high-heat cooking (e.g., stir-frying, searing, pan-frying) but is fine for lower heat cooking such as sautéing. For high-heat cooking, try canola, peanut, sunflower, or grapeseed oil, all of which have higher smoke points and still contain heart-healthy unsaturated fats.

  2. I heard that you should never use olive oil for cooking as the heat changes the properties of the oil making very bad for your health. Olive oil should only be used as a cold dressing, which is quite healthy for you.
    Can someone confirm this?

  3. Sarah, according to Dr. Kaul using olive oil just doesn’t taste as good in this recipe. If you do not have mustard oil he recommends using canola oil instead. -Kate

  4. question about the recipes, why does it say to use any vegetable oil except olive oil?

  5. Sure! Please see the additional two recipes below. -Kate

    Daal (Mixed Lentil and Beans), Punjabi-Style
    Makes 6 servings
    Ingredients
    2 cups premixed beans and lentils (available at many stores) or prepare a mixture of whole Urad Daal and kidney beans, soaked overnight in 8 cups water
    2 medium onions, peeled, divided
    1 jalapeno pepper
    1 heaping teaspoon ground turmeric
    1-inch piece of ginger root, peeled
    6 medium garlic cloves, peeled
    1 medium tomato
    1 cup fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves (removed from stems)
    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    1 heaping teaspoon ground cumin
    2 heaping teaspoons ground coriander
    1 heaping teaspoon Garam Masala
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon ghee
    1 teaspoon black cumin seeds (Shah Jeera)

    Preparation
    Put the bean-lentil mixture with the soaking water in a pressure cooker. Add ½ an onion cut into 3-4 pieces, jalapeno, turmeric, and salt. Close lid and bring pressure cooker to maximum pressure over high heat. Cook for 5 minutes, then immediately put the pressure cooker under cold running water to release pressure. Open lid. The beans should be soft enough to eat but not too soft. Set aside.

    Chop 1 onion into small pieces and the remaining ½ onion into very fine pieces; set aside. (Do not use food processor.)
    In a food processor, finely chop the ginger and garlic. Transfer to a bowl. Use the food processor to chop the tomato and coriander (cilantro) leaves, then transfer to a separate bowl.
    In a deep saucepan or other cooking pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion cut into small pieces and the garlic-ginger mixture, stirring until onion turns golden brown. Add the tomato-coriander mixture and stir. Add the cumin, ground coriander, Garam Masala, and salt, and stir for 2 to 3 minutes.
    Add the contents of the pressure cooker to the saucepan and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat and cover.
    In a separate small skillet, heat the ghee over medium heat. Add the remaining finely chopped onion and the black cumin seeds; cook until edges of onions turn brown. Transfer to the saucepan with the daal mixture and stir. Cook the daal, uncovered, for another 15 minutes over low heat.

    Nutrition information (per serving): 263 calories, 11 grams total fat (2 grams saturated fat, 3 grams monounsaturated fat, 1 gram polyunsaturated fat, 0 grams trans fat), 5 mg cholesterol, 224 mg sodium, 407 mg potassium, 38 grams total carbohydrate, 15 grams fiber, 3 grams sugar (0 grams added sugar), 13 grams protein


    Red Cabbage, Bengali-Style
    Makes 6 servings
    Ingredients
    2 tablespoons mustard oil (if not available, any other vegetable oil can be used except olive oil)
    1 heaping teaspoon cumin seeds
    1-inch cinnamon stick (crushed)
    1 bay leaf, crushed into 6-8 small pieces
    3 dried whole red chilies
    2 teaspoons ground turmeric
    1 medium red cabbage, cored and shredded with a food processor
    1-inch piece of ginger root, peeled and finely chopped with a food processor
    1 tablespoon Garam Masala
    1 teaspoon sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt

    Preparation
    Heat the oil in a saucepan. When hot, add cumin seeds and stir until seeds are light brown. Add cinnamon, bay leaf, red chilies, and ground turmeric and stir (don’t let the red chilies turn black and smoke). Add shredded cabbage to the spice mixture and stir for 2 minutes. Reduce heat and cook for 15 minutes.
    Combine the ginger, Garam Masala, sugar, and salt in a bowl. Add mixture to the cabbage and cook for an additional 5 minutes on low heat.

    Nutrition information (per serving): 100 calories, 5 grams total fat (0 grams saturated fat, 3 grams monounsaturated fat, 2 grams polyunsaturated fat, 0 grams trans fat), 0 mg cholesterol, 240 mg sodium, 379 mg potassium, 14 grams total carbohydrate, 4 grams fiber, 7 grams sugar (0.7 grams added sugar), 2 grams protein

  6. could you post the vegetarian recipes as well?

  7. Wonderful job. Keep up the gret work.

  8. Well Done, and yes- good on you for stepping up.

  9. Great work!! How fortunate that you were there to help! Good luck in your studies, you’ll make a wonderful PA. :)

  10. Excellent! Thank you for stepping up.

  11. I admire you for reaching out and making a difference. I have a daughter your age who is special like you, and I’m sure your parents and family are also very proud of you. Thank you for your courage!

  12. Well Done Amelia Corwin! You are a difference maker. What if you hadn’t been there?

  13. Proud of you. Great job.

  14. Great job!!!! Thanks for being on that plane

  15. Beautiful story–thank you for sharing it, Maddie.

  16. Maddie, thank you for sharing your touching personal story with us. We are so fortunate to have you on staff. May your sister’s memory touch you in so many special ways throughout your lifetime.

  17. Dr. Starr, a needle mover in the field of cardiac disease. I was born in 61, Dr. Starr Performed the 1st of the 4 he would perform on me as I grew; unable to receive a aortic valve as a child, corrective surgeries would carry me til age 25 where he was able to implant the Starr Edwards stalastic aortic ball valve; 32 years ago; still working like a champ. Thank you Dr.Starr!!

  18. The prime impact of OHSU in cardiovascular field took place in the early 1960s when a synthetic valve was placed in the heart and shown to function better than the diseased one it replaced. Dr. Starr lead the historic first with his support teams spread all across many clinical and research departments alike. An entirely new field was thus created in the annals of medicine with subsequent profound effects.

  19. What a beautiful story and thank you so much for sharing. These are the stories we hear every day that make us proud to work here.

  20. Maddie, I was so proud to be Allison’s aunt and be a (distant) part of her life as she, so bravely and gracefully, fought her battle. And I am so proud of you and to be your (favorite) aunt. You have written a beautiful piece and will keep Allison’s story alive by doing what you are doing.

  21. I remember Allison from her early days with that class, Maddie, and recall very clearly very much her classmates cared about her.

    Thank you for posting this. The very best of luck as you work with her at your side caring for our patients.

  22. Absolutely heartbreaking and beautiful.

  23. Wow.

  24. i’m only 13 and that was very awesome what you did

  25. Congrats to this impressively skilled team. Your passion and enthusiasm for your craft we are all thankful for.

  26. Great tips! I’d add a general winter tip of keeping a set of dry/warm clothes, winter shoes, and a blanket in your car. You never know when you might get stranded.

    This sentence though… Cracked me up. Seems like there’s a missing tip about evacuation.
    “Always try to warm up affected areas before attempting evacuation.”
    Evacuation of frozen parts?!

  27. So nice, thanks for sharing Hunter with staff and patients!

  28. I am so glad to see OHSU is participating in the EcoChallenge again this year. This is a great opportunity to make some positive changes in each of our daily routine.

    I really encourage folks to sign-up!

  29. I’m surprised about the point “Men are diagnosed with melanoma more frequently than women.” I always think maybe women are more easier to suffer it. Now I know what’s going on.–Nanobody (Creative Biolabs)

  30. Thank you for your service Dong Wouk! What a wonderful way to pay it forward, and what amazing work you are doing!!!! Thank you on behalf of the entire community!!!!!!

  31. Enjoy your retirement Carol! It is well deserved!

  32. Thanks for your questions, Susan!
    · Legumes such as dried beans and lentils are high in soluble fiber.
    · Diets rich in soy or soy-containing products appear safe and potentially beneficial. The long-term safety of high doses of soy isoflavone supplements is not yet known. It is not clear whether the estrogen-like activities of soy isoflavones have any negative health risks such as an increased risk of breast cancer, but it’s generally best to avoid these supplements until more research is done. (for more information regarding current research on soy, go here and here).
    · There isn’t a significant nutrient difference between raw or dry-roasted almonds, but beware of the extra calories, saturated fat, sugar, and/or salt in oil-roasted, honey-roasted, or other types of flavored almonds.
    · Most margarines no longer contain harmful trans fats and now have a healthier fat profile than butter. It’s still important to check the ingredient list of margarine (and all foods) for “partially hydrogenated oil,” which means the product does contain some trans fats (if it has less than 0.5 grams per serving, manufacturers are allowed to round down to 0 grams trans fat on the nutrition label). A tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat, while a tablespoon of a trans-fat-free margarine such as Smart Balance contains 2.5 grams of saturated fat. If you still prefer to avoid margarine, you can also find a blend of butter with canola oil (Land of Lakes Butter with Canola Oil contains only three ingredients: butter, canola oil, salt) that reduces the saturated fat to 4 grams per tablespoon; still high, but an improvement over butter. Better yet, choose healthy plant-based fats such as olive oil, avocado, or nut butters instead of butter or margarine.

    Hope this helps! – Tracy

  33. Thank you for this information, Tracy. Very helpful. A couple of questions, when you say “beans” regarding soluble fiber, do you mean green beans, legumes, or something else? At what intake of soy does the estrogenic effect start to occur? Regarding almonds, is there a nutritional difference between raw and roasted? Finally, it’s my understanding that margarines are NOT heart healthy and should never be eaten. Would you expand on this? Thanks so much.

  34. Wonderful advice from a wonderful doctor!

  35. Wonderful tips on ways to take better care of your eyes! Eyes are one of the most important parts of our bodies so we must take care of them. Thanks for sharing!

  36. Great work!

  37. Thank you! Not just to OHSU nurses, but to all nurses everywhere. Doctors tend to get most of the credit for curing and helping people, when really it’s the nurses working behind the scenes and in between operations and treatments that enable the “healthcare machine” to operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does. Without nurses, doctors wouldn’t be able to do what they do! :)

  38. I am so glad to hear about the global partnership between researchers and practitioners. This is how the best work and progress is made.

  39. Hi Myralee,

    You’re right – it’s Saturday, May 30, not Sunday. It’s been corrected. Thanks for keeping us on our toes!

  40. Your article leads off with date of event as, Sunday May 30th. I am assuming it is Saturday, correct?

  41. Dr Thornburg and all at the Moore Institute are to be commended on a truly spectacular summit! Their work brings to light nutritional deficits that affect girls and young women everywhere and directs a focus to working together toward improvement. Congratulations!

  42. I want to thank Martina Dunbar for being a great GI nurse. I have experienced GI symptoms for years and put off being worked up due to a fear of the idea of things done to me such as occurs with manometry testing. Martina Dunbar is one of our OHSU nurses who does manometry. I would not wish manometry on anyone but if you have to have it done you want Martina to be your nurse. She is very knowledgeable, skilled, and kind at the same time. Thank you Martina for being my nurse:)
    Dena

  43. GOD bless all of you and the health care providers that made this happen. Yes, it is a process, but, so worth it.

    I too am a Kidney Donor, but of a different kind. I chose to donate one of my kidneys to a person I did not know. It was thru the NON direct organ donation program thru the U of M in Minnesota. It will be 11 years on May 11th. Back in 2004, they did not have this program that the six of you shared. I chose to not meet my the person that received my kidney, for a few reasons. Back then you could not meet or have any contact with the individual for one year, and after that time BOTH had to agree to meet. After all we were given “2” kidneys at birth, and that was for the reason of sharing “1” with someone in need..

    All the best to all, and take care of that precious gift.

  44. Congratulations, Christina! Thank you for your courage in this situation.

  45. My Uncle’s son is a current dental student at OHSU in Portland and they are organizing a lobby day at the end of this month. They will be individually meeting with several members of the Oregon legislature to talk to them about our concerns/ideas regarding dentistry.

    He was wondering what are some important, powerful points that he can bring to their attention so that he can make the most out of this opportunity.

    Any advice or tips is Gr8full

  46. Thank you for your question. Simvastatin and pravastatin are drugs of the same class (statins) and with an identical mechanism of action (block production of cholesterol). They are both generic, covered by most insurances, and very inexpensive. They have both shown to be able to reduce heart attacks and stroke in clinical trials. To find differences between the two we need to look at potency of cholesterol reduction (40 mg of simvastatin is more powerful than 40 mg pravastatin) and safety of the compound (pravastatin is less frequently associated with muscle pain). For more information, we recommend reaching out to your health care provider. You can also visit us here: http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/health/services/heart-vascular/getting-treatment/. – Dr. Fazio

  47. What do you recommend: simvastatin or pravastatin? Or there isn’t too much difference between statins?

  48. I have been dealing with the same thing my entire life. I am 31 and to have spent most of my life at OHSU. I was born with 3 congenital heart defects and have had 5 open heart surgeries so far. I am so happy to see that your story is starting to help bring awareness to CHD!!! Thank you for sharing your life story.

  49. My granddaughters has ushers, and has been to the casey hospital the last 3 years and i will be jioning her this summer in portland, just wanted to say thanks for all your doing and i know in time that this will be figured out

  50. Being a colon cancer survivor myself I felt very inspired by her story and look forward to starting a new healthier life with lots of veggies and fruits and walking lots with my dog.

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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