Race for the Cure: Shirley’s story

For Shirley Ira, participating as a Race for the Cure team captain is both personal and professional: an experience that blends her many years coordinating care for oncology patients at OHSU Casey Eye Institute (CEI) with some personal losses. In 1991 the Susan G. Komen Foundation was about to launch its first Race for the Cure event in the Portland area and Ira had volunteered to be a team captain, representing CEI: at the time, … Read More

Race for the Cure: a mother’s legacy

For Race for the Cure Team Captain Jill Mason, participating in the Susan G. Komen breast cancer fundraiser and outreach event in Portland each year is a family event inspired by a woman who is dearly loved and remembered. After their mother, Cricket, died of breast cancer in the Spring of 1993, Mason and her sister rallied family members together to participate in the walk the following year. “Cricket’s Crew hasn’t missed a year since … Read More

Summer road trips: Making the most of fast food

This is a continuation of our best tips for eating well on the road. Read the first article here. As much as I’d love to have only freshly prepared meals on road trips, being on the road (and on a budget) can at times make fast food inevitable. Use these tips to make the most of a potentially unhealthy situation. Make it a true “happy” meal Wherever you end up, always remember the formula for … Read More

Training tomorrow’s data scientists

The following is an abbreviated version of a blog post titled “Technical education for a connected world,” authored by Stephen Wu, an assistant professor of medical informatics and clinical epidemiology at OHSU School of Medicine. In it, Wu shares how including peer reviews in his class led him to develop a new approach to technical education: one that centers around five core values that he believes to be essential to both scholarly and professional development. The original post can … Read More

Go Green with OHSU: Join the EcoChallenge

How does protecting the environment matter for human health? That’s something I think about a lot, along with my fellow Green Team members. Public health and environmental protection are deeply intertwined, so it makes sense that one of the ways OHSU promotes healing is through sustainable practices. The Green Team is a group of employees who are committed to sustainability and the environment, and work together, many of them on a volunteer basis, to advance … Read More

Your health questions answered: What can I do about high cholesterol?

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This month, one of our cardiovascular experts is on the hot seat. Q. I eat healthy, exercise and am not overweight – but I have high cholesterol. What can I do? A. Average low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol is below 125; when it is above 160, you may have been born with high cholesterol. Talk to your primary care provider. You may have a genetic condition called familial … Read More

Tackling childhood obesity in rural Oregon

To counter the alarming growth in childhood obesity across the country, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recently announced $500 million additional dollars to its longstanding campaign to achieve a healthy weight for all children. These new funds bring the total to an unprecedented $1 billion since 2007 to build a culture of health across communities in the U.S. and ensure that all children have access to healthier foods and opportunities to be physically active. But … Read More

Annual picnic celebrates OHSU transplant family

It started out as a potluck planned by liver patients in the 1990s. Since then, the OHSU Transplant Picnic has become an annual event for hundreds whose lives have been touched by transplants. The event is an opportunity for transplant recipients and their families to get together outside the clinic setting to share stories, give hope and spend time with their transplant teams. Clinical Transplant Services Outreach Coordinator Sondra Tootell shares more about the picnic’s … Read More

Ice, ice, baby: OHSU takes on the ALS #IceBucketChallenge

At OHSU, we’re all about stepping up to the challenge – even if it involves a bucket (or multiple buckets) full of ice water. Recently, several OHSU’ians, including President Dr. Joe Robertson and Doernbecher Children’s Hospital’s Physician-in-Chief Stacy Nicholson, have voluntarily donated and been drenched as part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. The challenge is a viral movement designed to raise awareness about ALS and funds for charities like the ALS Association. Click here … Read More

Reflections on Match Day

Today, members of the OHSU medical school Class of 2014 found out where they will be spending the next few years of their lives as they transition from medical student to resident. Although separated by only a few weeks in time (Match Day is in March and the first day of their internship is usually July 1), the gap between being a student and being a resident is vast. Of course there are the obvious differences: … Read More

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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