Cardiology

Register for the Portland Metro HeartMap Challenge

Did you know? Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. It can happen to anyone, anytime, anywhere and at any age. An automated external defibrillator (AED) is the only effective treatment for restoring a regular heart rhythm during sudden cardiac arrest and is an easy to operate tool for anyone with little to no medical background. Studies have shown that during a cardiac arrest if the victim receives … Read More

Your health questions answered: Cancer treatment and your heart

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This month, our cardiology and pediatric specialists are on the hot seat. Q. Can cancer treatments damage my heart? A. While cancer treatments including radiation and chemotherapy may help fight the disease, they may have negative side effects on your heart. Although this is rare, treatment can weaken your heart muscle or affect your heart’s ability to pump blood. Before you begin a cancer treatment that might affect the … Read More

Your health questions answered: A woman’s risk for stroke and “normal” periods

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This month, our stroke and pediatric specialists are on the hot seat. Q. Is a woman’s risk of stroke higher than a man’s? A. Yes. Of the 6.8 million stroke survivors in America, 3 million are men, while 3.8 million are women. The American Heart and American Stroke Associations recently released stroke guidelines that suggest how woman can lower stroke risk. Women who’ve had pre-eclampsia during pregnancy should talk to their … Read More

Is chocolate good for your heart?

Cocoa has been long been known for its good taste. But several epidemiological studies and some small prospective studies have shown that cocoa exerts beneficial cardiovascular effects. These beneficial effects seem to be mediated by its polyphenols, especially flavanols, a group of natural chemicals found primarily in fruits and vegetables. The beneficial effects of cocoa include improvement in endothelial function (the lining of your artery wall), the reduction in platelet function (decreasing the chances of a blood clot), and … Read More

Put some “Spring” in your step

With the days growing longer, it’s the perfect time to take advantage of spring weather and enjoy the outdoors. As a trainer for OHSU’s March Wellness Center, I see how exercise benefits my clients physically and mentally every day. At age 30, a woman’s bone density starts to decline, and it’s crucial to build that back up. Exercise is one of the best things you can do to rebuild and maintain your bone mineral density. Working out … Read More

Ask the Health Expert: When are statins effective?

You ask. OHSU experts answer. Q: When are statins effective? And what are the side effects? A: Your question is a timely one. Statins are a class of drugs used to lower LDL cholesterol levels, and they’re one of the safest classes of medications that we have. Recently (November of 2013), the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the new national guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce the risk of … Read More

Love yourself. Love your heart.

By Kate Geller, Knight Cardiovascular Institute This Valentine’s Day, try to take inspiration from all of the heart-shaped cards, chocolate boxes and balloons to show yourself some love, by focusing on your own heart health. Almost everyone has risk factors for heart disease, but thankfully, we can all practice prevention by exercising heart-healthy eating habits. Margarine vs. Butter? A question our experts often get from patients is around cooking with margarine or butter. According to Tina Kaufman, … Read More

Angioplasty, Discovered at OHSU, Celebrates 50 Years

By Kate Geller, Knight Cardiovascular Institute It’s one of the most common medical interventions on the planet. Each year, millions of people undergo the procedure. And it has spawned some of the most important innovations in biotechnology. It’s angioplasty, and it all started in a small radiology suite on the 11th floor of OHSU’s Hospital 50 years ago. The Father of Interventional Radiology On Jan. 16, 1964, Dr. Charles T. Dotter performed the world’s first percutaneous … Read More

Latina health and a return to traditional food culture

I have been involved in the research field that arose some 25 years ago as a result of Professor David Barker’s discovery that established the connection between a person’s birth weight and their risk of dying of heart disease. His study found that the lower a baby’s birth weight, the more likely they were to die of heart disease as an adult. Similar studies have since found correlations between birth weight and the risk of … Read More

What you should know about heart attack symptoms in women

Editor’s note: Yesterday, actress and comedienne Rosie O’Donnell posted about her recent heart attack on her blog. She ended her post: “know the symptoms ladies listen to the voice inside the one we all so easily ignore   CALL 911 save urself xxx”   After reading Rosie’s post, we asked Dr. Diana Rinkevich, director of our Heart Disease in Women program, to share the symptoms of heart disease in women with our readers. Written by … Read More

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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