Cancer

OHSU celebrates Volunteer Week

The word “volunteer” was first used around the year 1600 and comes from the Latin “of one’s free will.” Years later, the state of Tennessee became known as the “Volunteer State,” when – during the Mexican war – a call for 2,800 volunteers brought forth nearly 30,000 men. Every year, hundreds of Oregonians freely offer up their valuable time and resources to support our patients, staff and students. When we make the call, OHSU volunteers … Read More

OHSU celebrates National Doctors Day

In celebration of March 30th as National Doctors Day, we sat down with OHSU’s Dr. Nate Selden to ask what inspired him to become a physician – and what continues to inspire him in his day-to-day life as the Chair of Pediatric Neurosurgery at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and Director of OHSU’s Neurological Surgery Residency Program. Below, find an excerpt of Dr. Selden’s post, originally published on our Doernbecher “Healthy Families” blog. What’s the most rewarding part of … Read More

OHSU’s Most Read Blog Posts of 2014

OHSU’s President, Dr. Joe Robertson, recently noted that the year has been filled with stories that will be “noteworthy 50 years from now.” And it’s true. From the unprecedented, national support for our $1 Billion Knight Cancer Challenge to global health outreach and preparation around the devastating Ebola virus outbreak, here’s what you may have missed; a round-up of our most read blog posts of the year: 1. 8 Things to Know About Ebola Although the odds … Read More

GET FIT trial leads to improved health, better habits for one patient

Patty McWayne became depressed after being diagnosed with colon cancer in 2004. In 2013, Patty received an invitation to join the GET FIT trial, which aims to improve of the lives of women cancer survivors through regular exercise. This is her story. My doctors helped me live a normal life after diagnoses of heart disease and diabetes in the 1990s, but I became depressed when diagnosed with colon cancer in 2004. The depression was enough … Read More

Cancer and comedy: Local filmmaker explores the importance of humor

By Matt Wastradowski In the wake of his mother’s death from breast cancer, 21-year-old Ben Schorr discovered something: It seemed like everyone around him had their own cancer stories. What’s more, the people who shared those stories often added a dose of humor. His improv comedy teacher at PSU, where Ben studies film and political science, joked about her diagnosis regularly. After his friend’s father had passed away after battling cancer, that friend – the … Read More

Melanoma event to spotlight latest research and survivor stories

By Matt Wastradowski Shon Ramey began his seven-year fight against skin cancer in 2007, when he was first diagnosed with melanoma. Growing up in Washington State, he never used sunscreen and admitted that his goal was to get tan as fast as possible. But after four surgeries in seven years, he understands more than ever the importance of proper skin care and remaining vigilant about the dangers of melanoma. Ramey will be one of three … Read More

Your health questions answered: Cancer treatment and your heart

You ask. OHSU health experts answer. This month, our cardiology and pediatric specialists are on the hot seat. Q. Can cancer treatments damage my heart? A. While cancer treatments including radiation and chemotherapy may help fight the disease, they may have negative side effects on your heart. Although this is rare, treatment can weaken your heart muscle or affect your heart’s ability to pump blood. Before you begin a cancer treatment that might affect the … Read More

The dangers of “MDS” and what OHSU is doing about it

As cancer treatments improve, survivors are living longer. The treatments, unfortunately, put some survivors at risk for secondary conditions. About 13,000 cancer survivors in the United States are diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) each year, typically after receiving radiation or chemotherapy. While these treatments don’t directly cause MDS, they put patients at a higher risk for the disease over time, as the number of new diagnoses is on the rise each year. Gabrielle Meyers, M.D., … Read More

A user’s guide to your thyroid

Body temperature. Appetite. Fatigue. You may be surprised to learn that your thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped body part right below your Adam’s apple controls all of them — and more. Like the control tower at an airport, your thyroid directs the behind-the-scenes actions of your body. The thyroid creates two important hormones called triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). T3 and T4 are made with the help of iodine, a chemical found in foods including iodized … Read More

How important is early detection in testicular cancer?

Today more than ever, patients, providers and researchers are working together to rethink the basis for early detection of cancer. Taking lessons learned from the cancer survivorship movement, we are appreciating that success isn’t only about improving survival rates, but how patients survive. In most cases, success in early detection means that a patient will survive with less intensive therapy that is more cost effective with less interruption to their quality of life. As a … Read More

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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