What you need to know about Zika virus

This post originally appeared on the OHSU Doernbecher Healthy Families blog. Medical and public interest has focused on Zika virus and its effects on the unborn babies of pregnant women. Zika virus is spread by mosquitoes; this virus has been detected in countries in Central America, South America, the Caribbean and Mexico. Zika virus usually causes mild disease (fever, rash, pink eye, joint pains) and goes away without the person needing much medical attention. However, … Read More

Eating well in the new year

Have you resolved to eat better in 2016, but you aren’t quite sure where to start? Last week, U.S. News & World Report released their annual review of 38 popular diets and chose the best based on ease, nutrition, safety, and effectiveness. The top ten best diets on the list are all safe, smart, and healthy eating plans. This report can be used as a guide for choosing a plan that will work best with your … Read More

On 10K, a sister’s love carries on

The 10th floor of OHSU’s Peter O. Kohler Pavilion is a meaningful place for Maddie Collet. Her sister, Allison, was a patient in the unit after she was diagnosed with brain cancer. She passed away when Maddie was 13. Maddie, a Certified Nursing Assistant, now cares for patients on that same floor. Below, she shares her family’s story and the ways in which Allison continues to inspire and influence her own path. *** When my sister … Read More

Three Common Misconceptions about Melanoma

Former President Jimmy Carter shared recently that he is being treated for four spots of melanoma on his brain, sparking a national conversation and revealing some misconceptions that persist about melanoma. In light of this conversation, we asked renowned melanoma researcher Dr. Sancy Leachman to dispel some of the most common myths she hears about this disease. Myth #1: Brain cancer starts in the brain. Fact: Often, people think that cancers that are in the brain start in the brain, but many … Read More

OHSU celebrates Volunteer Week

The word “volunteer” was first used around the year 1600 and comes from the Latin “of one’s free will.” Years later, the state of Tennessee became known as the “Volunteer State,” when – during the Mexican war – a call for 2,800 volunteers brought forth nearly 30,000 men. Every year, hundreds of Oregonians freely offer up their valuable time and resources to support our patients, staff and students. When we make the call, OHSU volunteers … Read More

OHSU celebrates National Doctors Day

In celebration of March 30th as National Doctors Day, we sat down with OHSU’s Dr. Nate Selden to ask what inspired him to become a physician – and what continues to inspire him in his day-to-day life as the Chair of Pediatric Neurosurgery at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and Director of OHSU’s Neurological Surgery Residency Program. Below, find an excerpt of Dr. Selden’s post, originally published on our Doernbecher “Healthy Families” blog. What’s the most rewarding part of … Read More

March Round-up: Brain Awareness Season and Doernbecher’s “Brave Bots”

Each month, OHSU faculty, staff and students publish exciting new research, academic advice and health stories across the blogosphere. In case you missed them, here is a round-up of some of our top blog posts of the month: Med School Parenting Made Easy With This One Simple Trick! How hard could it be? OHSU School of Medicine student and mom to a toddler, Megan Thruston, shares her study habit secrets and parenting adventures – with a good … Read More

OHSU discovery makes TIME’s Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs

OHSU researchers have been on a roll in 2013, continuing to make significant scientific discoveries that make big news, nationally and internationally. In fact, OHSU’s Shoukhrat Mitalipov just made #4 on Time magazine’s list of of Top 10 Medical breakthroughs in 2013, for his work in embryonic stem cells. Mitalipov led a group of scientists at OHSU’s Oregon National Primate Research Center, who announced in May that they had successfully reprogrammed human skin cells to become … Read More

Telestroke patient benefits from effort to extend the window for stroke treatment

By Wayne Clark, M.D. Most everyone knows how important it is to seek immediate medical attention if you are experiencing stroke symptoms. Clot buster medications (TPA) are most effective when given within three hours of a stroke and newer clot removing devices (stent retrievers) are approved for use up to eight hours after known stroke onset. However, patients and families cannot always get to the emergency room in time. Examples include if the stroke occurs … Read More

Time is brain: How telemedicine improves stroke care

Written by Wayne Clark, M.D. Last October, a 74-year-old woman was brought to the Mercy Medical Center emergency department in Roseburg with stroke symptoms. Mercy Medical’s Brent Crabtree, M.D., called OHSU and requested a telemedicine consultation. Minutes later, an OHSU stroke neurologist was examining the patient using a two-way audio-video robot that had been wheeled to her bedside. The exam showed the patient had suffered a stroke. Working with Crabtree, OHSU’s Hormozd Borzorgchami, M.D., prescribed … Read More

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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