Community Health

Bringing hand therapy to Ghana

Each year, the American Association for Hand Surgery selects a single applicant to receive the Vargas International Hand Therapy Award. The purpose of the award is to foster an exchange of educational ideas between hand therapists in the AAHS and in the host country, resulting in improved patient care for upper extremity problems. The 2015 winner of the Vargas Award was OHSU’s Adam Crelling, a Certified Hand Therapist in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation. … Read More

What you need to know about Zika virus

This post originally appeared on the OHSU Doernbecher Healthy Families blog. Medical and public interest has focused on Zika virus and its effects on the unborn babies of pregnant women. Zika virus is spread by mosquitoes; this virus has been detected in countries in Central America, South America, the Caribbean and Mexico. Zika virus usually causes mild disease (fever, rash, pink eye, joint pains) and goes away without the person needing much medical attention. However, … Read More

OHSU’s Most Read Blog Posts of 2015

“OHSU has one purpose and that purpose is to improve the health and well being of Oregonians. And we live that each and every day across all of our missions and across all 96 thousand square miles of this state.” – OHSU President Dr. Joe Robertson From groundbreaking partnerships that advance global health to a seemingly simple act of heroism by an “off the clock” OHSU nursing student, this year was full of large and small stories that changed the … Read More

Five facts about frostbite

Winter is upon us, and it’s important to keep your family safe in dropping temperatures. Whether you’re hitting the slopes or just working outside around the house, be sure know these five facts about frostbite: Frostbite is caused by freezing injury usually to the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers and toes, parts of the body frequently exposed to the cold and whose circulation is easily impaired due to the cold. Prevention includes keeping these body parts covered with insulation, not going … Read More

A big step for our tiniest patients: Oregon, Portland have nation’s lowest premature birth rates

In a new report from the March of Dimes, the national non-profit dedicated to improving the health of babies by preventing birth defects, infant mortality and premature birth, Oregon, Portland and Vancouver have the lowest rates of premature babies. According to the March of Dimes, “preterm births are defined as births before 37 weeks of pregnancy and are a leading cause of infant mortality.” In their 2015 Premature Birth Report Card, Oregon’s preterm birth rate … Read More

The evolving human: Will our kids be another species?

We live very differently than our ancestors did several hundred years ago – we have more food, have indoor plumbing and are generally more clean. We also hve more scientific knowledge to combat illnesses. Three hundred years ago, almost no one with a serious nut allergy lived long enough to reproduce. Today, despite an environment in which food allergies have increased by 50 percent in just over a decade, 17 million Americans who suffer from food allergies … Read More

The Tragedy in Roseburg

The awful events at Umpqua Community College have profoundly affected the nation and amplify the fear and foreboding of other tragedies too close to home. The rapidity, intensity and repetitiveness with which the news about these events has been spread is symptomatic of the deep wounds inflicted by this senseless violence. The families that have lost their children and loved ones, the traumatized friends, townspeople, police, and health care personnel are burdened with the unbearable. Others … Read More

Paying it forward on the Casey Outreach Van

I came to the United States from Korea when I was 14 years old. I did not come from a wealthy family, and frequently needed a place to stay during school breaks. When people kindly opened their homes to me, I asked how I could repay them. Their answer always was, “Help others in need when you can.” Fast forward to 2014, when I became a resident at OHSU Casey Eye Institute. Casey’s commitment to … Read More

Thank you to OHSU’s “Godmother of Midwifery”

By Ariane Le Chevallier, OHSU Communications  How lucky I am to have known someone who was so hard to say goodbye to! This month, we celebrate the retirement of Dr. Carol Howe, Associate Dean for Practice at OHSU’s School of Nursing and Director of the Nurse-Midwifery Education Program. Dr. Howe has served OHSU for over 35 years and her remarkable contributions to midwifery and women’s health, not only at OHSU, but all across Oregon are truly … Read More

Simple steps to maximize heart health

By now, we’ve all heard the recommendations for a heart-healthy diet – reduce your saturated fat intake, avoid trans fats, cut back on salt. But did you know there are specific foods you can eat that can help lower your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol even further? Researchers have created a “portfolio” of cholesterol-lowering foods, that, when eaten together along with a heart-healthy diet, are even more effective at reducing LDL cholesterol than a low-saturated fat diet alone. Follow … Read More

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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