Five facts about frostbite

Winter is upon us, and it’s important to keep your family safe in dropping temperatures. Whether you’re hitting the slopes or just working outside around the house, be sure know these five facts about frostbite: Frostbite is caused by freezing injury usually to the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers and toes, parts of the body frequently exposed to the cold and whose circulation is easily impaired due to the cold. Prevention includes keeping these body parts covered with insulation, not going … Read More

A big step for our tiniest patients: Oregon, Portland have nation’s lowest premature birth rates

In a new report from the March of Dimes, the national non-profit dedicated to improving the health of babies by preventing birth defects, infant mortality and premature birth, Oregon, Portland and Vancouver have the lowest rates of premature babies. According to the March of Dimes, “preterm births are defined as births before 37 weeks of pregnancy and are a leading cause of infant mortality.” In their 2015 Premature Birth Report Card, Oregon’s preterm birth rate … Read More

Dr. Sanjiv Kaul first in Oregon to receive prestigious national cardiology award

Congratulations to Sanjiv Kaul, M.D., Director of the OHSU Knight Cardiovascular Institute, who received the American Heart Association’s highest clinical honor, the James B. Herrick Award for Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Cardiology. Dr. Kaul is the only cardiologist in Oregon to receive this distinction. He was recognized “in grateful recognition of his highly significant discoveries expanding the field of cardiovascular diagnostic imaging and greatly enhancing the care of patients with heart and blood vessel disease,” according to the … Read More

The Tragedy in Roseburg

The awful events at Umpqua Community College have profoundly affected the nation and amplify the fear and foreboding of other tragedies too close to home. The rapidity, intensity and repetitiveness with which the news about these events has been spread is symptomatic of the deep wounds inflicted by this senseless violence. The families that have lost their children and loved ones, the traumatized friends, townspeople, police, and health care personnel are burdened with the unbearable. Others … Read More

A healing duo: Meet Hunter and Belinda

When Belinda and Sean McCully went to adopt a dog, they knew Hunter was the one. “We instinctively knew he was going to be a good dog,” Belinda said. Hunter, a 6-year-old Labrador/hound mix, has proven to be much more than a gentle, loyal pet. He and Belinda, a Research Assistant Professor with the Division of Trauma in the Surgery Department at OHSU, team up to provide animal-assisted therapy to Cardiovascular ICU patients, families, faculty … Read More

Paying it forward on the Casey Outreach Van

I came to the United States from Korea when I was 14 years old. I did not come from a wealthy family, and frequently needed a place to stay during school breaks. When people kindly opened their homes to me, I asked how I could repay them. Their answer always was, “Help others in need when you can.” Fast forward to 2014, when I became a resident at OHSU Casey Eye Institute. Casey’s commitment to … Read More

Three Common Misconceptions about Melanoma

Former President Jimmy Carter shared recently that he is being treated for four spots of melanoma on his brain, sparking a national conversation and revealing some misconceptions that persist about melanoma. In light of this conversation, we asked renowned melanoma researcher Dr. Sancy Leachman to dispel some of the most common myths she hears about this disease. Myth #1: Brain cancer starts in the brain. Fact: Often, people think that cancers that are in the brain start in the brain, but many … Read More

Intel & OHSU Announce Collaborative Cancer Cloud at Intel Developer Forum

Each year millions of people all over the world, including more than 1 million patients in the United States, learn that they have a cancer diagnosis. Instead of going through painful chemotherapy that can kill healthy cells along with cancerous cells, what would happen if those patients were able to be treated as individuals based on their specific genome sequencing, and a precision treatment plan could be tailored specifically for their disease? And what if … Read More

Three Questions for OHSU’s Dr. Karen Oh

Meet Karen Oh, M.D., associate professor of diagnostic radiology in the OHSU School of Medicine and Director of Breast Imaging at OHSU. Dr. Oh functions as part of a multidisciplinary breast team that includes subspecialized breast surgeons, radiation oncologists, hematologic oncologists, genetic counselors and breast health nurses. Dr. Oh recently spoke with the OHSU School of Medicine about developments in diagnostic radiology – including the passage of new legislation that aims to educate patients on … Read More

Memories of a White Coat

Last Friday, it was my pleasure to serve as the emcee for the M.D. Class of 2019 White Coat Ceremony and the J.S. Reinschmidt Lecture. The white coat is a time honored tradition in the medical field, marking an important step in each future physician’s journey. I remember when I was sitting in that seat, during my own White Coat Ceremony at the University of Utah Medical School. I was filled with plenty of emotions … Read More

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

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