Archive for 2012

Should Portland provide fluoridated water to its residents?

Written by Gary T. Chiodo, D.M.D., F.A.C.D. Community water fluoridation has been named by the Centers for Disease Control as one of the top 10 public health measures of all time. Now, Portland has the opportunity to join with other major cities and provide fluoridated water to its residents. Currently, 74 percent of Americans are connected to fluoridated water systems and, with the advent of fluoridation in Portland, that percentage will increase. With 65 years … Read More

Class(ical) notes

Written by Mark Kemball OHSU has been home to some excellent musical ensembles over the years. Three of the following four groups have been active at OHSU at some point between the mid 1950s and today. The fourth is–at least for the moment–wholly fictitious. Can you spot the imposter? The Forcep Four. A barbershop quartet, whose repertoire included a performance of “Jungle Town” with a live chimp and a skunk as “props” and a great … Read More

OHSU earns Magnet designation for nursing excellence

Written by Deborah Eldredge, Ph.D., R.N. On Thursday, August 23, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANNC) awarded OHSU Magnet Recognition for Nursing Excellence. The designation is no small achievement. It is only awarded to hospitals that meet the highest standards of patient care. In fact, only about 6 percent of hospitals across the country achieve Magnet status. In order to earn the Magnet designation, some 2,200 nurses throughout OHSU completed several important steps to demonstrate … Read More

What you should know about heart attack symptoms in women

Editor’s note: Yesterday, actress and comedienne Rosie O’Donnell posted about her recent heart attack on her blog. She ended her post: “know the symptoms ladies listen to the voice inside the one we all so easily ignore   CALL 911 save urself xxx”   After reading Rosie’s post, we asked Dr. Diana Rinkevich, director of our Heart Disease in Women program, to share the symptoms of heart disease in women with our readers. Written by … Read More

Curriculum transformation: Six ways to have your voice heard

Written by Jeff Kraakevik, M.D. I have had the privilege to work with the curriculum transformation committee for the OHSU School of Medicine for the last few months. The group has a variety of viewpoints represented at the table, and we have had some very lively and thought-provoking discussions on how the medical curriculum can best prepare students to be the physicians of the early twenty-first century (we can leave the 24 1/2th century to … Read More

Personal statement

Written by Jackie Wirz, Ph.D. Fall is swiftly approaching, and with it comes a new crop of students*.  It seems like only yesterday that I was writing my applications for graduate school and dealing with the universally awkward “Personal Statement” essay. One of my goals was to never use the words “destiny”, “passion” or “dream”.  And definitely no Robert Frost quotes**. To be sure, my attempts at squishing a lifetime of hopes and dreams into … Read More

Early life diet and its link to chronic diseases

Written by Kent Thornburg, Ph.D. Nowadays it does not seem so audacious to entertain the idea that most chronic disease could be eradicated from the human race. In no previous time could we consider the idea with a straight face. In earlier times we had no idea how to prevent diseases which had no known cause. Though the field of medicine had a long laundry list of disease causes among which were infectious agents, gene … Read More

A vintage year for 2s and 7s

Written by Mark Kemball Oregon may well be known for its wines, but no vineyards are to be found on the south-facing slopes of Marquam Hill. The tram lacks tie-downs for the transportation of aged oak barrels. The finer points of pigeage–the French wine-making term for the annual stomping of the grapes–are absent from the academic curriculum. But we do share one characteristic with the grape harvesters and the wine makers: we mark the graduation … Read More

Five-year anniversary of life-saving telemedicine revolution

Written by Miles Ellenby, M.D. Five years ago, OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene started a quiet revolution in the treatment of critically ill pediatric patients in Oregon. We launched a two-way audio/video connection that virtually puts Portland-based pediatric intensivists at the bedside of young patients in Eugene. OHSU specialists can help Eugene pediatricians diagnose patients and initiate treatment minutes after the patient arrives in the emergency room. Telemedicine also … Read More

It’s a circus out there

By Jackie Wirz, Ph.D. Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Portland premiere of Cirque du Soliel’s Ovo. It is an inspired performance that incorporates acrobats, aerialists, some pretty amazing trampolining crossed with rock climbing (!) and more than a few flamboyantly costumed bugs. The small size of the tent makes you feel like you are involved in a surreal dream that strangely involves feats of strength on a tightrope, acts of amazing coordination … Read More

OHSU Health Fair at Pioneer Square.

Why 96,000 Square Miles?

President Robertson is fond of saying that OHSU has a 96,000 square mile campus, serving Oregonians “from Enterprise to Coos Bay, from Portland to Klamath Falls.”

This blog aims to highlight that breadth. 96,000 Square Miles (96K for short) will focus on the people of OHSU, the Oregonians we serve and the ripple effect of our work in Oregon and beyond.

Read more

Participation Guidelines

Remember: information you share here is public; it isn't medical advice. Need advice or treatment? Contact your healthcare provider directly. Read our Terms of Use and this disclaimer for details.

Categories